Tag Archives: poem

TRR EXTRA: “The Wind of Summer” by Madison Cawein



Sorry I’ve been absent for so long. Truth is, I’ve been sick as a dog since the middle of June, and was unable to record anything for you. I’m on the mend, though, and finally managed to croak out this lovely poem for you. Hopefully there will be a full episode for you next week!

“The Wind of Summer” by Madison J. Cawein

The Reader

TRT: 04:36

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com.


TRR EXTRA: “Maple Sugar” by Alfred B. Street



Here’s another Extra for you. A poem fitting the time of year, as the maple sap is running and the sugar houses are preparing to go into full swing with their amber harvest.

“Maple Sugar” (1849) by Alfred B. Street

The Reader

TRT: 5:27

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com.


TRR EXTRA: “The Old Year and the New” by W.H. Rhodes



Out with the old, in with the new. Here’s a fitting poem to end 2016 with, by William Henry Rhodes. Rhodes’ most famous work was “A Case for Summerfield” (1871), which featured a villain named Black Bart. A real criminal later took up the name as an alias, and we still recognize the name “Black Bart” as a western outlaw today via songs, cartoons, and stories set in the Old West. Here’s hoping your new year will be bountiful and full of good fortune and joy.

“The Old Year and the New” by W. H. Rhodes

The Reader

TRT: 3:15

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com.


TRR EXTRA: “Twas the Night Before Christmas”



Here we share with you the classic Christmas poem better known as “Twas the Night Before Christmas.” A little candy cane for your holiday!

“A Visit From St. Nicholas” by Clement Clarke Moore

The Reader

TRT: 4:40

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com.


TRR: Episode 64, “Christmastime”



In this episode, we offer you a few Christmas stocking stuffers in keeping with the season.

“The Willow Man” by Juliana Horatia Ewing
“What I Want for Christmas” (1897) by Robert G. Ingersoll
“A Christmas Turkey” (1862) by Crocket McElroy
“The New Food” (1910) by Stephen Leacock
“Christmas Afternoon” (1921) by Robert C. Benchley

The Reader

TRT: 21:49

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com.


TRR EXTRA: “The Snowstorm” by Ralph Waldo Emerson



A short verse from Emerson, describing the handiwork of the snow.

“The Snowstorm” by Ralph Waldo Emerson

The Reader

TRT: 2:33

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Darren Baker.


TRR EXTRA: “The Wind” by Robert Louis Stevenson



Author Robert Louis Stevenson is best known for his classic tales of adventure, such as “Treasure Island” and “Kidnapped!” However, Stevenson also wrote verses for children, such as the one we now offer as a November Extra for you.

“The Wind” by Robert Louis Stevenson

The Reader

TRT: 02:13

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com.


TRR EXTRA: “The Listeners” by Walter de la Mare



Walter de la Mare was a prolific and well-respected author of novels, short stories, and poems. His writing was an inspiration to others both during his life and after. Among his many works, he occasionally dabbled in horror stories and the supernatural. In this October Extra, we share with you one of his most famous works, taken from his 1916 collection, “The Listeners and Other Poems.” The poem is part ghost story, and part mystery (what was the promise made by the Traveller?), and has a spooky tone just perfect for October, as we approach the penultimate spook-fest that is Halloween Night!

“The Listeners” (1916) by Walter de la Mare

The Reader

TRT: 02:31

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com.


TRR EXTRA: “Lines Written in Boston On a Beautiful Autumnal Day”



Here’s another Autumnal extra for you, a poem written by Margaret Fuller Ossoli.

“Lines Written in Boston On a Beautiful Autumnal Day” (1859) by Margaret Fuller Ossoli

The Reader

TRT: 03:32

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com.


TRR: Episode 55, “The Raven”



Edgar Allen Poe was a man seemingly marked for unhappiness throughout his life. Even so, he wrote a large body of work that has secured his legacy for all time.

For our second installment of spooky tales in honor of this Halloween month, we offer you one of the most famous poems in all of American literature.

“The Raven” (1845) by Edgar Allen Poe

The Reader

TRT: 14:57

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com.