Tag Archives: narration

TRR: Episode 32, “Keeping Tryst”



We submit for your approval a story set in the fair days of King Arthur and the Age of Chivalry. Our selection this week is a story from children’s author Annie Fellows Johnston, in which a young page sets out to earn his knighthood. As usual with stories for children from the early 20th Century, this one is built around a strong moral lesson.

“Keeping Tryst: A Tale of King Arthur’s Time” (1905) by Annie Fellows Johnston

The Reader

TRT: 30:55

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com, Paul Arden-Taylor from Musopen.org, and Martini from Jamendo.com.


TRR: Episode 29, “The Velveteen Rabbit”



Just in time for Easter, or any time for that matter, we present for your consideration the story of the Velveteen Rabbit. Elements of the story have been around and incorporated into other stories both before and since Margery Bianco first conceived the tale, including a vague reference to The Blue Fairy in Pinocchio, and later, to the Lion King who ruled over the Island of Misfit Toys in “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer.”

“The Velveteen Rabbit, or How Toys Become Real” (1922) by Margery Williams Bianco

The Reader

TRT: 29:49

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com.


TRR: Episode 28, “Robin of the Hood”



You may think you know the tales of merry Robin Hood by heart, but his origins are perhaps a bit murkier than you may realize. In this episode, we look back to the wellspring of the Robin Hood legend as we think of it, the book by Howard Pyle. Pyle’s book combined the many Robin Hood legends into a single narrative form, and set the stage for all the Robin Hood stories, films and TV shows that were to follow.

“The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood” (1883) by Howard Pyle

The Reader

TRT: 28:22

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com, Archive.org, and Martini from Jamendo.com.


TRR: Episode 27, “The Emerald Isle”



In this episode, in honor of St. Patrick’s Day, we take a short journey to the Emerald Isle herself, Ireland.

“The Wearing of the Green” by Anonymous
“The Harp” (1840) by Anonymous, from “The Irish Penny Journal”
“Rain Song” and “Irish Idyl” from “Sprays of Shamrock” (1914) by Clinton Scollard
“The Leprechawn” and “The Banshee” from “Irish Wonders” (1888) by D.R. McAnally, Jr.
“The Faires’ Dancing Place” by William Carleton
“The New Life in Ireland” from “Just Irish” (1911) by Charles Battell Loomis
“The Green Little Shamrock of Ireland” by Andrew Curry

The Reader

TRT: 28:19

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com and Archive.org. “Though the Last Glimpse of Erin” performed by Michael J. O’Donnell.


TRR: Episode 26, “The Great White North”



Our neighbor to the North, Canada, is the subject of this week’s show. Specifically, immigration to that proud and native land. Starting in the early 19th Century, a great wave of immigrants made their way to the Dominion to start a new life in a land of promise and opportunity lacking in Britain and Europe. Many guidebooks were available for the new prospective citizen of Canada, from which we share a small selection.

“Pictures of Canadian Life” (1886) by J. Ewing Richie
“The Great Dominion” from “Peeps at Many Lands: Canada” (1909) by J.T Bealby
“Canada and the British Immigrant” (1914) by Emily P. Weaver
“Fifty Below Zero” from “Peeps at Many Lands: Canada” (1909) by J.T Bealby
“O, Canada” (1908) By Robert Stanley Weir

The Reader

TRT: 26:47

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com, Archive.org, and Librivox.org. “O, Canada” performed by Christiane Levesque.


TRR: Episode 24, “Celestial Visitors”



Comets, once poetically (though inaccurately), called “wandering stars,” have had a profound impact upon the history of our world and its civilizations. In this episode, we take a look at early theories of what a comet was made of, where they came from, and their purpose in the minds of people generations before the Rosetta probe and its Philae lander.

“Aether and Gravitation” (1903) by William George Hooper
“Comets and Meteors” (1873) by Daniel Kirkwood
“The Comet” by Irving Sidney Dix
A quotation of Mark Twain (1909)
“The Story of the Solar System” (1895) by George F. Chambers
“Could a Comet Strike the Earth?” from “Ragnarok: The Age of Fire and Gravel” (1883) by Ignatius Donnelly
“The Song of a Comet” by Clark Ashton Smith

The Reader
TRT: 28:56

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com.


TRR: Episode 23, “Little Arrows”



The penultimate Hallmark Holiday, St. Valentine’s Day, has come ’round yet again. Can you avoid the little winged archer?

“Flower Love” by Marguerite Radclyff-Hall
“A Lover Since Childhood” by Robert Graves
“Topography” by Carolyn Wells
“Time’s Valentine” by Carolyn Wells
“Old Valentines” from “The Lovers’ Baedeker and Guide to Arcady” (1912) by Carolyn Wells
“Cupid and Psyche” from “Old Greek Folk Stories Told Anew” (1897) by Josephine Preston Peabody
“How Do I Love Thee?” by Elizabeth Barrett Browning

The Reader
TRT: 38:28

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com and Jocopo Salvatori.


TRR: Episode 20, “Blue Hawaii”



As we dig out from the remnants of the blizzard of ’16, Snowzilla, perhaps it would be a good time to visit a tropical paradise. In this episode, we take to the warmer, inviting climes of Hawaii…

“A Smile of Fortune” an excerpt from “‘Twixt Land & Sea” by Joseph Conrad

“The Bright Land” from “The Spell of the Hawaiian Islands & the Philippines” (1916) by Isabel Anderson

“The Lovers,” an excerpt from “Ballads” (1895) by Robert Louis Stevenson

An excerpt from “Our Little Hawaiian Cousin” (1902) by Mary Hazelton Wade

“Love-Life in a Lanai” from “South-Sea Idyls” (1873) by Charles Warren Stoddard

“Aloha Oe (Farewell to Thee)” by Queen Liliukalani

The Reader

TRT: 42:07

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com and Archive.org.


TRR: Episode 19, “Dots & Dashes (Part 2)”



The telegraph operator was, in many cases, a woman, just as many telephone operators are even today. In this episode, we survey the prospects for the fair sex in the field of telegraphy, which may lead to a decent wage, and, even the possibility of romance across the telegraph wires.

“Telegraphy” by Gerorge J. Manson, from “Work for Women” (1883)
“The Telegrapher’s Valentine” by J.C. Maxwell (1860)
“Wired Love” (1880) by Ella Cheever Thayer

The Reader

TRR: Episode 19, “Dots & Dashes (Part 2)”
TRT: 24:23

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com.


TRR: Episode 16, “Christmastime is Here”



As the old song says, “Christmastime is here.” In this, the second half of our Christmas celebration, we offer you a small array of stocking-stuffers and candy canes for your holiday enjoyment.

“The Overture” by H.S. Armstrong (1869)
“A Ballad of Santa Claus” by Henry Van Dyke (1907)
“Bells of Christmas” (1913) by The Edison Concert Band & Chorus
“Old Thoughts for Christmas” by Christopher Morley
“Under the Mistletoe” by George Francis Shults
“Our Joyful Feast” by George Wither
“Christmas” from “The Long Ago” by Jacob William Wright
“Silver Bells” by Hamish Hendry

Merry Christmas!

The Reader

TRR: Episode 16, “Christmastime is Here”
TRT: 39:59

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com.
“Jingle Bells Piano Solo” by Kaveh. You can find more of Kaveh’s work on Soundclick.com.