Tag Archives: narration

TRR EXTRA: “The Wind of Summer” by Madison Cawein



Sorry I’ve been absent for so long. Truth is, I’ve been sick as a dog since the middle of June, and was unable to record anything for you. I’m on the mend, though, and finally managed to croak out this lovely poem for you. Hopefully there will be a full episode for you next week!

“The Wind of Summer” by Madison J. Cawein

The Reader

TRT: 04:36

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com.


TRR: Episode 84, “The Story of a Thousand-Year Pine”



Trees are among the longest-lived organisms on our planet. In this episode, we share a story about a yellow pine that was over a thousand years old.

“The Story of a Thousand-Year Pine” (1909) by Enos A. Mills

The Reader

TRT: 29:40

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com.


TRR: Episode 79, “Death’s Old Sweet Song”



Pulp fiction was popular during the entire first half of the 20th Century, bringing tales of adventure, romance, horror, science fiction, and crime to the masses. This week, we hear a tale taken from the September 1946 issue of Dime Mystery Magazine.

“Death’s Old Sweet Song” (1946) by George William Rae

The Reader

TRT: 16:41

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com and Archive.org.


TRR: Episode 76, “The Wreck of the Titan”



This week marks the 105th anniversary of the sinking of the RMS Titanic. In this episode, we take a look at a novel written fourteen years earlier which eerily predicted the disaster.

“Futility, or The Wreck of the Titan” (1898) by Morgan Robertson
“The Titanic Disaster Poem” (1912) by J.H. MacKenzie

The Reader

TRT: 24:39

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com.


TRR: Episode 74, “Under a Wine Glass”



Success, found, lost and searched for, is the theme of our story this week.

“Under a Wine Glass” (1919) by Ellen La Motte

The Reader

TRT: 24:49

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com.


TRR EXTRA: “Autumn” by Miss Fanny Kemble



In honor of the arrival of Autumn, we offer you this poem by Miss Fanny Kemble. Kemble was a British actress and author during the mid-19th Century. This poem she wrote one October during a trip to the Schuylkill River in Eastern Pennsylvania.

“Autumn” by Miss Fanny Kemble

The Reader

TRT: 04:18

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com.


TRR: Episode 49, “An Idyl of the Honey-Bee”



Naturalist and conservationist John Burroughs was one of the most influential men in his field at the turn of the last century. He wrote in a lyrical romantic style which made his observations on Nature accessible. In this episode, we present one of his essays on the bee and hunting honey in the wild.

“An Idyl of the Honey-Bee” (1881) by John Burroughs

The Reader

TRT: 48:06

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com.


TRR: Episode 40, “Ursa Minor”



Poor little Ursa Minor, so worthy of our respect, but so overshadowed by his more famous companion, Ursa Major. Just like people in everyday life, which is the topic of Zephine Humphrey’s essay about the marginalized little constellation.

“Ursa Minor” (1913) by Zephine Humphrey

The Reader

TRT: 28:07

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com.


TRR: Episode 39, “Solander’s Radio Tomb”



In this episode, we offer a story written in 1927 about the then still-new wonder that was Radio. Humorist Ellis Parker Butler wrote the story and it appeared in “Amazing Stories” magazine, and later reprinted there in 1956. Butler was, surprisingly, only a part-time author. Despite writing several books and over 2,000 short stories and articles in his 40-year long career, Butler was a full-time banker.

“Solander’s Radio Tomb” (1927) by Ellis Parker Butler

The Reader

TRT: 22:12

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com and Archive.org.


TRR: Episode 38, “The Homeburg Telephone Exchange”



George H. Fitch, the “Smile King,” was a humorist who was popular at the turn of the 20th Century. Fitch was part of the tradition of gentle, observational humor later carried on by Will Rogers and Garrison Keillor. In this episode, we share a story from Fitch’s small fictional home town, Homeburg.

“The Homeburg Telephone Exchange” (1915) by George H. Fitch

The Reader

TRT: 27:09

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com and Archive.org.