Tag Archives: history

TRR: Episode 84, “The Story of a Thousand-Year Pine”



Trees are among the longest-lived organisms on our planet. In this episode, we share a story about a yellow pine that was over a thousand years old.

“The Story of a Thousand-Year Pine” (1909) by Enos A. Mills

The Reader

TRT: 29:40

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com.


TRR: Episode 44, “The Election of 1936”



“The more things change, the more they stay the same.” That old saying was never more true than it is in our national politics. For example, the Presidential election of 2016 is strikingly similar to the election of 1936. The rhetoric, the partisanship, the demonization of candidates, the issues of class, fear, and frustration, are at heart not so different. As you listen, keep that old adage in mind and ask yourself, how much, really, have things changed after eighty years?

Selections from the essay “We and I” (1936) by Malcom W. Bingay
An excerpt of John Hamilton’s speech to the GOP convention
“On the Eve of the Election” from “Speaking of Change” (1939) by Edward A. Filene

The Reader

TRT: 35:47

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com and Archive.org.


TRR: Episode 42, “Will Radio Replace the Phonograph?”



As we, like every generation before us, face a changing world, it pays to look back and see we are not alone in our uncertainty. Seeing the old and familiar fall by the wayside may cause some anxiety, but it is nothing new. At one point in the early 1920’s, there was apprehension that the new technology of radio would threaten the dominance of the phonograph for musical entertainment. Such is the subject of our selection, taken from the November, 1922 issue of Radio Broadcast Magazine.

“Will Radio Replace the Phonograph?” (1922) by Winslow A. Duerr

The Reader

TRT: 17:12

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com and Archive.org.


TRR: Episode 37, “Grandfather’s Three Lives”



Clarence Day, Jr. is perhaps most famous for his autobiographical memoir about his family, “Life With Father” (1935). Day passed away before seeing the fame the novel reached, including a Broadway play and the 1947 film starring William Powell.

In his 1921 collection, “The Crow’s Nest,” Day wrote a biography of Sir Charles Dilke. In this episode, we’ll hear Day’s story of Charles Dilke, how he came to power, and subsequently, to ruin.

“Grandfather’s Three Lives” (1921) by Clarence Day, Jr.

The Reader

TRT: 29:15

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com and Archive.org.


TRR: Episode 26, “The Great White North”



Our neighbor to the North, Canada, is the subject of this week’s show. Specifically, immigration to that proud and native land. Starting in the early 19th Century, a great wave of immigrants made their way to the Dominion to start a new life in a land of promise and opportunity lacking in Britain and Europe. Many guidebooks were available for the new prospective citizen of Canada, from which we share a small selection.

“Pictures of Canadian Life” (1886) by J. Ewing Richie
“The Great Dominion” from “Peeps at Many Lands: Canada” (1909) by J.T Bealby
“Canada and the British Immigrant” (1914) by Emily P. Weaver
“Fifty Below Zero” from “Peeps at Many Lands: Canada” (1909) by J.T Bealby
“O, Canada” (1908) By Robert Stanley Weir

The Reader

TRT: 26:47

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com, Archive.org, and Librivox.org. “O, Canada” performed by Christiane Levesque.