Tag Archives: audiobooks

TRR: Episode 63, “Snow-flakes” by Nathaniel Hawthorne



Winter is only truly here when we see snow. In this episode, we turn to “Twice-Told Tales” and a story in which Nathaniel Hawthorne describes the first real snowfall of the season.

“Snow-flakes” (1837) by Nathaniel Hawthorne

The Reader

TRT: 19:04

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com and Archive.org.


TRR EXTRA: “Red October” by Helen Gray Cone



Autumn has always been my favorite season, so here is another Autumnal extra for you, in honor of the advent of October! I’ll have a few of these this month, interspersed in between our spooky stories celebrating Halloween.

“Red October” by Helen Gray Cone

The Reader

TRT: 01:52

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com.


TRR: Episode 53, “School Lets Out”



Robert Nathan was an author, poet, and playwright. You may know of some of his works, albeit from the ones that had been adapted to films. Nathan penned the original source material for “Portrait of Jennie” (1948) starring Joseph Cotton, and the seminal Christmas film “The Bishop’s Wife” (1947), with Cary Grant. In this episode, we’ll hear excerpts from one of Nathan’s novels featuring an elderly schoolmaster.

“Autumn” (1921) by Robert Nathan

The Reader

TRT: 20:58

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com.


TRR EXTRA: “Autumn” by Miss Fanny Kemble



In honor of the arrival of Autumn, we offer you this poem by Miss Fanny Kemble. Kemble was a British actress and author during the mid-19th Century. This poem she wrote one October during a trip to the Schuylkill River in Eastern Pennsylvania.

“Autumn” by Miss Fanny Kemble

The Reader

TRT: 04:18

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com.


TRR: Episode 52, “The Masked World”



Jack Williamson wrote science fiction stories from the 1920’s until his death in 2006. He was known for writing in a realistic style that won many admirers in the genre, including a young Issac Asimov.

In this episode, we’ll hear one of his short stories from the August 1963 issue of “Worlds of Tomorrow” magazine.

“The Masked World” (1963) by Jack Williamson

The Reader

TRT: 15:16

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com.


TRR: Episode 51, “Staccato Notes of a Vanished Summer”



Author, editor, and critic William Dean Howells was known by his friends and contemporaries as “The Dean of American Letters.” He was a proponent of “Realism,” a new “documentary” style that slowly eclipsed Romanticism in American writing. In this episode, we hear one of his descriptive essays of a fading summer on the coast of Maine.

“Staccato Notes of a Vanished Summer” (1902) by William Dean Howells

The Reader

TRT: 27:21

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com.


TRR: Episode 47, “Bluebeard”



Once as well-known as other fairy tales, “Bluebeard” has perhaps fallen by the wayside in the last fifty years or so. In this episode, we examine the story of “Bluebeard,” one of the most famous tales of a murderer in literary history. His specialty was wives with too much curiosity. Charles Perrault formulated the tale from previous stories involving the supernatural, and stories of some real life killers.

“Bluebeard” (1697) by Charles Perrault, translation by J.R Planche (1858)

The Reader

TRT: 19:02

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com and Martini from Jamendo.com.


TRR: Episode 46, “A Horseman in the Sky”



Journalist, critic, and author Ambrose Bierce penned a collection of short stories about war which was considered one of the best anti-war fiction ever written. Bierce served in the Union army during the Civil War, and his real life experiences helped to lend an air of authenticity to his writings. In this episode, we hear one of his more famous short stories about the personal cost of war.

“A Horseman in the Sky” (1889) by Ambrose Bierce

The Reader

TRT: 23:07

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com.


TRR: Episode 45, “The Street Singer’s Romance”



The tenor Arthur Tracy was popular in the 1920’s and 30’s, going by the name of “The Street Singer.” His version of “Pennies From Heaven” was chosen from among hundreds for the soundtrack of the 1981 film of the same name. Tracy had one true love, but their relationship was complicated by the fact that she was trapped in a loveless marriage.

“The Street Singer’s Romance Revealed” by John Skinner, from Radio Stars Magazine, Sept., 1933

The Reader

TRT: 24:28

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com and Archive.org.


TRR: Episode 43, “The Barbershop”



Few things are as commonplace and as timeless as the barber shop. Hair is synonymous with vitality, and it must be properly cared for. In this episode, we look at hair cuts and hair loss.

“In the Chair” (1916) by Ralph Bergengren
“Concerning Hair-Restorers” (1915) by Frank X. Finnegan

The Reader

TRT: 29:15

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com and Archive.org.