Category Archives: Myths & Legends

TRR: Episode 58, “The Werewolf” by Eugene Field



Unlike other classic monsters, the curse of the werewolf is particularly cruel in that when he transforms into his wolfen form, he is compelled to kill those he loves best.

For our final selection of spooky tales for October, we offer you a tale of lycanthropy from author Eugene Field.

“The Werewolf” (1911) by Eugene Field

The Reader

TRT: 25:56

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com.


TRR: Episode 56, “Varney the Vampire”



Contrary to popular belief, Dracula was not the first vampire in literature, or even in film. Decades before Bela Lugosi essayed the evil, undead count, and before Bram Stoker chronicled his famous novel that film was based on, a vampire was introduced in England through a series of penny dreadful periodicals. “Varney the Vampire” introduced to popular culture much of the vampire lore we know today. For our third offering of spooky tales this October, we share the first chapter of that story.

“Varney the Vampire” (1845) by James Rymer and Thomas Prest

The Reader

TRT: 22:39

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com.


TRR: Episode 50, “Lost Pond”



Many states have a legend of a so-called “lost pond,” a place found by the early pioneers and woodsmen, but never marked properly on a map. All that remained were the stories told by the old-timers, the location itself lost to the wilderness. In this episode, we follow a pair of anglers in search of one such lost pond.

“Lost Pond” (1915) by Henry Abbott

The Reader

TRT: 30:15

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com.


TRR EXTRA: Poems by Nora May French 2



No regular show this week, as I was hit with a cold mid-week, and was in no shape to record anything. Instead, I managed to put this together for you, another set of poems by Nora May French.

“Oh, Dryad Thoughts” & “The Nymph” by Nora May French

The Reader

TRT: 08:01

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com.


TRR: Episode 47, “Bluebeard”



Once as well-known as other fairy tales, “Bluebeard” has perhaps fallen by the wayside in the last fifty years or so. In this episode, we examine the story of “Bluebeard,” one of the most famous tales of a murderer in literary history. His specialty was wives with too much curiosity. Charles Perrault formulated the tale from previous stories involving the supernatural, and stories of some real life killers.

“Bluebeard” (1697) by Charles Perrault, translation by J.R Planche (1858)

The Reader

TRT: 19:02

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com and Martini from Jamendo.com.


TRR: Episode 36 “Little Red Riding Hood”



The story of Little Red Riding Hood has been retold many, many times since first being introduced widely by The Brothers Grimm. The tale has many different versions, some tame and others a scary warning against misbehaving. This version is told in rhyme, published anonymously in London in 1857, most likely by poet Richard Trott Fisher.

“Little Red Riding Hood” (1857) by Richard Trott Fisher

The Reader

TRT: 14:05

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com and Archive.org.


TRR: Episode 32, “Keeping Tryst”



We submit for your approval a story set in the fair days of King Arthur and the Age of Chivalry. Our selection this week is a story from children’s author Annie Fellows Johnston, in which a young page sets out to earn his knighthood. As usual with stories for children from the early 20th Century, this one is built around a strong moral lesson.

“Keeping Tryst: A Tale of King Arthur’s Time” (1905) by Annie Fellows Johnston

The Reader

TRT: 30:55

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com, Paul Arden-Taylor from Musopen.org, and Martini from Jamendo.com.


TRR: Episode 28, “Robin of the Hood”



You may think you know the tales of merry Robin Hood by heart, but his origins are perhaps a bit murkier than you may realize. In this episode, we look back to the wellspring of the Robin Hood legend as we think of it, the book by Howard Pyle. Pyle’s book combined the many Robin Hood legends into a single narrative form, and set the stage for all the Robin Hood stories, films and TV shows that were to follow.

“The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood” (1883) by Howard Pyle

The Reader

TRT: 28:22

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com, Archive.org, and Martini from Jamendo.com.


TRR: Episode 27, “The Emerald Isle”



In this episode, in honor of St. Patrick’s Day, we take a short journey to the Emerald Isle herself, Ireland.

“The Wearing of the Green” by Anonymous
“The Harp” (1840) by Anonymous, from “The Irish Penny Journal”
“Rain Song” and “Irish Idyl” from “Sprays of Shamrock” (1914) by Clinton Scollard
“The Leprechawn” and “The Banshee” from “Irish Wonders” (1888) by D.R. McAnally, Jr.
“The Faires’ Dancing Place” by William Carleton
“The New Life in Ireland” from “Just Irish” (1911) by Charles Battell Loomis
“The Green Little Shamrock of Ireland” by Andrew Curry

The Reader

TRT: 28:19

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com and Archive.org. “Though the Last Glimpse of Erin” performed by Michael J. O’Donnell.


TRR: Episode 23, “Little Arrows”



The penultimate Hallmark Holiday, St. Valentine’s Day, has come ’round yet again. Can you avoid the little winged archer?

“Flower Love” by Marguerite Radclyff-Hall
“A Lover Since Childhood” by Robert Graves
“Topography” by Carolyn Wells
“Time’s Valentine” by Carolyn Wells
“Old Valentines” from “The Lovers’ Baedeker and Guide to Arcady” (1912) by Carolyn Wells
“Cupid and Psyche” from “Old Greek Folk Stories Told Anew” (1897) by Josephine Preston Peabody
“How Do I Love Thee?” by Elizabeth Barrett Browning

The Reader
TRT: 38:28

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com and Jocopo Salvatori.