Monthly Archives: August 2016

TRR EXTRA: Poems by Nora May French 2



No regular show this week, as I was hit with a cold mid-week, and was in no shape to record anything. Instead, I managed to put this together for you, another set of poems by Nora May French.

“Oh, Dryad Thoughts” & “The Nymph” by Nora May French

The Reader

TRT: 08:01

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com.


TRR: Episode 49, “An Idyl of the Honey-Bee”



Naturalist and conservationist John Burroughs was one of the most influential men in his field at the turn of the last century. He wrote in a lyrical romantic style which made his observations on Nature accessible. In this episode, we present one of his essays on the bee and hunting honey in the wild.

“An Idyl of the Honey-Bee” (1881) by John Burroughs

The Reader

TRT: 48:06

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com.


TRR EXTRA: Poems by Nora May French 1



As an extra offering this month, we present two poems by Nora May French from a collection of her work posthumously published by her literary colleagues and admirers in 1910.

“My Nook” and “You” by Nora May French

The Reader

TRT: 03:56


TRR: Episode 48, “My Summers in New England”



Sara Willis was one of the most popular and successful newspaper columnists of her time. She was born into a family of publishers, but when her older brother refused to print any of her work in the Home Journal magazine that he published, she worked under a pen name to make her own way at writing. She liked her pen name, Fanny Fern, so much, she adopted it as her own in all facets of her life. Nathaniel Hawthorne admired her zest, and she defended Walt Whitman’s “Leaves of Grass” against unappreciative critics of the time. In this episode, we hear excerpts from one of her essays on the benefits of New England life.

“My Summers in New England” (1868) by Fanny Fern

The Reader

TRT: 24:26

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com.


TRR: Episode 47, “Bluebeard”



Once as well-known as other fairy tales, “Bluebeard” has perhaps fallen by the wayside in the last fifty years or so. In this episode, we examine the story of “Bluebeard,” one of the most famous tales of a murderer in literary history. His specialty was wives with too much curiosity. Charles Perrault formulated the tale from previous stories involving the supernatural, and stories of some real life killers.

“Bluebeard” (1697) by Charles Perrault, translation by J.R Planche (1858)

The Reader

TRT: 19:02

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com and Martini from Jamendo.com.