Monthly Archives: July 2016

TRR: Episode 46, “A Horseman in the Sky”



Journalist, critic, and author Ambrose Bierce penned a collection of short stories about war which was considered one of the best anti-war fiction ever written. Bierce served in the Union army during the Civil War, and his real life experiences helped to lend an air of authenticity to his writings. In this episode, we hear one of his more famous short stories about the personal cost of war.

“A Horseman in the Sky” (1889) by Ambrose Bierce

The Reader

TRT: 23:07

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com.


TRR: Episode 45, “The Street Singer’s Romance”



The tenor Arthur Tracy was popular in the 1920’s and 30’s, going by the name of “The Street Singer.” His version of “Pennies From Heaven” was chosen from among hundreds for the soundtrack of the 1981 film of the same name. Tracy had one true love, but their relationship was complicated by the fact that she was trapped in a loveless marriage.

“The Street Singer’s Romance Revealed” by John Skinner, from Radio Stars Magazine, Sept., 1933

The Reader

TRT: 24:28

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com and Archive.org.


TRR: Episode 44, “The Election of 1936”



“The more things change, the more they stay the same.” That old saying was never more true than it is in our national politics. For example, the Presidential election of 2016 is strikingly similar to the election of 1936. The rhetoric, the partisanship, the demonization of candidates, the issues of class, fear, and frustration, are at heart not so different. As you listen, keep that old adage in mind and ask yourself, how much, really, have things changed after eighty years?

Selections from the essay “We and I” (1936) by Malcom W. Bingay
An excerpt of John Hamilton’s speech to the GOP convention
“On the Eve of the Election” from “Speaking of Change” (1939) by Edward A. Filene

The Reader

TRT: 35:47

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com and Archive.org.


TRR: Episode 43, “The Barbershop”



Few things are as commonplace and as timeless as the barber shop. Hair is synonymous with vitality, and it must be properly cared for. In this episode, we look at hair cuts and hair loss.

“In the Chair” (1916) by Ralph Bergengren
“Concerning Hair-Restorers” (1915) by Frank X. Finnegan

The Reader

TRT: 29:15

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com and Archive.org.


TRR: Episode 42, “Will Radio Replace the Phonograph?”



As we, like every generation before us, face a changing world, it pays to look back and see we are not alone in our uncertainty. Seeing the old and familiar fall by the wayside may cause some anxiety, but it is nothing new. At one point in the early 1920’s, there was apprehension that the new technology of radio would threaten the dominance of the phonograph for musical entertainment. Such is the subject of our selection, taken from the November, 1922 issue of Radio Broadcast Magazine.

“Will Radio Replace the Phonograph?” (1922) by Winslow A. Duerr

The Reader

TRT: 17:12

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com and Archive.org.