Monthly Archives: May 2016

TRR: Episode 37, “Grandfather’s Three Lives”



Clarence Day, Jr. is perhaps most famous for his autobiographical memoir about his family, “Life With Father” (1935). Day passed away before seeing the fame the novel reached, including a Broadway play and the 1947 film starring William Powell.

In his 1921 collection, “The Crow’s Nest,” Day wrote a biography of Sir Charles Dilke. In this episode, we’ll hear Day’s story of Charles Dilke, how he came to power, and subsequently, to ruin.

“Grandfather’s Three Lives” (1921) by Clarence Day, Jr.

The Reader

TRT: 29:15

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com and Archive.org.


TRR: Episode 36 “Little Red Riding Hood”



The story of Little Red Riding Hood has been retold many, many times since first being introduced widely by The Brothers Grimm. The tale has many different versions, some tame and others a scary warning against misbehaving. This version is told in rhyme, published anonymously in London in 1857, most likely by poet Richard Trott Fisher.

“Little Red Riding Hood” (1857) by Richard Trott Fisher

The Reader

TRT: 14:05

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com and Archive.org.


TRR: Episode 35 “To a Wild Rose”



Edward MacDowell was an American composer, once considered one of the greatest musical geniuses of his time. MacDowell died in 1908, at the mere age of 47 years. By the end of the 1950’s he was all but forgotten, supplanted by the American greats who would follow. In this episode, we share an assessment of his life and work written for the New York Herald shortly before his death.

“An American Composer: The Passing of Edward MacDowell” (1906) by James Huneker

The Reader

TRT: 24:36

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com and Museopen.org.


TRR: Episode 34, “The Vision of the Fountain”



This week we share with you one of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “Twice-Told Tales,” a reverie of young romance. Hawthorne’s two volume collection of “Twice-Told  Tales” were called such because they had been previously published in various periodicals, and a line from Shakespeare: “Life is as tedious as a twice-told tale, / Vexing the dull ear of a drowsy man.”

“The Vision of the Fountain” by Nathaniel Hawthorne

The Reader

TRT: 20:18

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com, and by Jason Shaw at Audionautix.com.


TRR: Episode 33, “Cinders From the Ashes”



Oliver Wendell Holmes was a physician, medical reformer, poet, educator and author, and penned a medical essay in 1843 on the nature of contagion which was hailed as a turning point in American medicine. He gained international acclaim as a writer for his “Breakfast-Table” books, written in a conversational style he termed “table-talk.” In this episode we share one of Holmes’ essays, reminiscing about the school days of his youth.

“Cinders From the Ashes” (1879) by Oliver Wendell Holmes

The Reader

TRT: 41:09

The musical accompaniment for the show is provided through the kind generosity of Incompetech.com.